Buckland Monachorum Parish CouncilCoat of Arms of Sir Francis Drake - courtesy of Buckland Abbey Coat of Arms of Sir Francis Drake - courtesy of Buckland Abbey

CRAPSTONE

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HISTORY OF CRAPSTONE

"Crap" in Devonshire dialect means "crop" a crop of stones or Crapstone. The meaning of the name comes from the fields where the first building took place at "Crapstone Barton".

The land was part of the Buckland Abbey estate, and had been granted to Richard Crymes in 1546, who built Crapstone Barton as his manor house.

The Crymes sold on a lot of the land but in the early part of the 20th century it was bought back by Lady Seaton. So four centuries later, Crapstone estate returned to Buckland Abbey estates.

The first houses were Crapstone Terrace built in the 1880s. The Firs was also built around the same time, as was Crapstone Villas a couple of years later. Building was taking off with new properties being built each year including some large houses. From 1917 to 1932 two of these larger houses Challoch and Melrose were used by the nuns; their order known as the Convent of the Poor Clares. Challoch was used for the nuns and Melrose was the chapel. It was known as St Anthonys Convent and was used by the Roman Catholics in the area before the opening of Holy Cross Church Yelverton.

The Crescent used to be called North road until 1910 when the road from Pound lodge to the top of Stokehill lane was constructed, and it was renamed The Crescent.

By 1920 there were about 80 houses in Crapstone, including terraces and large detached family houses. There was also a post office and general store which is still here today. By 1939 there was also a butchers shop a builders yard and store (redeveloped as housing in the 1980’s) and two garage repair workshops.

The parish war memorial stone at the crossroads was unveiled in 1921.

After the war the Communal Site for RAF Harrowbeer off Abbey Road was used as a naval stores depot. It was in use until the early 1980's when it closed and was redeveloped by Wimpey Homes in 2000 and is now known as Stonemore. At the same time the parish council acquired from MoD about 4 acres of the depot for use as a sports and leisure ground.

Coat of Arms of Sir Francis Drake - courtesy of Buckland Abbey